BLAFROKAN - Many Tribes, One Blood

Sugar Land 95 Town Hall Needs Black Support


SUGAR LAND, TEXAS – The Forced Labor Justice Coalition of Fort Bend.  I am requesting you either attend one of the two town hall meetings or complete the Feedback Form at the bottom of the website in the link below to express interest and support for 3 or more floors of the Imperial Char House being dedicated to a National Forced Labor Museum. Of course, we would also like you to express interest and support in the museum being named after Reginald Moore, the Activist and Historian who worked to unearth a buried history.

See the information below and attend a community town hall.

Join us for any of the two town halls co-hosted by PUMA and the City of Sugar Land. PUMA, a Houston-based boutique development firm specializing in creating experience-driven, mixed-use communities, has requested support from the city of Sugar Land and the Sugar Land Development Corporation (SLDC) toward preservation of the Char House and eventual development of the remainder of the Imperial Historic District. Sugar Land City Council and SLDC will be considering financial support of the project as it progresses, the press release states.

WHEN: Dec. 8th at 5:30 p.m. and Dec. 15th at 5:30 p.m. 

WHERE: Sugar Land Heritage Museum and Visitor Center at 198 Kempner St., Sugar Land, TX 77498

OR

ONLINE: Send your feedback to the Imperial Char House Preservation on the form included at the bottom of this link.

https://www.sugarlandtx.gov/2328/Imperial-Char-House-Preservation#


“And The Beat Goes On…Sugar Land 95” by Obidike Kamau, Ph.D

“…a 100 year old crime scene was discovered in Sugar Land, Texas. The Fort Bend Independent School District is currently constructing a new technical center, and in the process of preparing the ground unearthed a gravesite that consisted of 95 bodies of what were apparently victims of what was accurately called the convict-lease system. This system was created and utilized to enable white southerners continued access to free Black labor after the end of slavery. The peculiar institution as the enslavement of descendants of African people was called by a historian was formally ended in 1865 with the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution. Ending our enslavement placed a hardship on states throughout the south. Labor costs always hugely impact profit margins in any business, and the institution of enslavement was an incredible boom to the U.S. south…” Continue reading HERE

Carol Cummings, Ph.D.

Carol Cummings, Ph.D.

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